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Correlation of B virus and herpes simplex virus antibodies in human sera

  • V.J. Cabasso
    Footnotes
    Affiliations
    From the Virus Immunological Research Department, Lederle Laboratories U.S.A.

    From the American Cyanamid Co. U.S.A.

    From the United States Army Biological Laboratories, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md. U.S.A.

    From the Pitman Moore Research Center, Zionsville, Ind. U.S.A.

    Pearl River, N. Y. U.S.A.
    Search for articles by this author
  • W.A. Chappell
    Footnotes
    Affiliations
    From the Virus Immunological Research Department, Lederle Laboratories U.S.A.

    From the American Cyanamid Co. U.S.A.

    From the United States Army Biological Laboratories, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md. U.S.A.

    From the Pitman Moore Research Center, Zionsville, Ind. U.S.A.

    Pearl River, N. Y. U.S.A.
    Search for articles by this author
  • J.E. Avampato
    Footnotes
    Affiliations
    From the Virus Immunological Research Department, Lederle Laboratories U.S.A.

    From the American Cyanamid Co. U.S.A.

    From the United States Army Biological Laboratories, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md. U.S.A.

    From the Pitman Moore Research Center, Zionsville, Ind. U.S.A.

    Pearl River, N. Y. U.S.A.
    Search for articles by this author
  • J.L. Bittle
    Footnotes
    Affiliations
    From the Virus Immunological Research Department, Lederle Laboratories U.S.A.

    From the American Cyanamid Co. U.S.A.

    From the United States Army Biological Laboratories, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md. U.S.A.

    From the Pitman Moore Research Center, Zionsville, Ind. U.S.A.

    Pearl River, N. Y. U.S.A.
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Address: Virus Immunological Research Department, Lederle Laboratories.
    ∗∗ Address: Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Ga.
    ∗∗∗ Address: Pitman Moore Research Center.
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      Abstract

      A total of 113 laboratory workers, whose history of contact with monkeys or monkey tissues ranged from 0 to 30 years, were tested for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and B virus (BV) neutralising antibodies. Eighty-three per cent of them were positive for HSV antibody and 69 per cent were positive for BV antibody. Of the 35 persons negative for BV antibody, 18 were also negative for HSV antibody. There was no difference in the rate of either antibody between males and females, but a distinct increase in the rates and levels of both was noted with increase in age. No significant correlation could be established between, the rate of presence of BV antibody and duration of contact with monkeys or their tissues. In only one instance was BV antibody detected, and that in low level, in a person with no HSV antibody. This man had been working with monkeys for less than 1 year. In all other cases, BV antibody occurred only when HSV antibody was also present, and a striking correlation was noted between the levels of the two antibodies: BV antibody was absent when HSV antibody was absent or had a geometric mean titer of 1:22; its mean rose to 1:7 when that of HSV was 1:48, and to 1:24 when that of HSV was 1:88. HSV antibody levels were also higher than those of BV in 3 of 4 commercial lots of human gamma globulin of placental origin, although the reverse was true of the fourth lot. The levels of BV antibody of five experimental lots of gamma globulin from monkeys, prepared by the same procedure and to the same protein concentration, were comparable to those of gamma globulin from humans. The implications of these findings with regard to the protection of man against accidental infection with BV have been discussed.
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